A review of the lines written in the early spring by william wordsworth

A very emotional poem that slowly but steadily draws the reader in like a web of fine silvery thread. At the onset, he is surrounded by nature but there is something preventing full enjoyment.

It is the connection of man and Nature and what man has done that brings out the melancholy tone.

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Another, deeper level of meaning comes in with the connection to Nature. As a result, the rhythm of the poem is generally constant. He has no presence in the poem; no thoughts, no personality, no ideas.

Otherwise, Wordsworth's scene-setting is spare. The "budding twigs" are growing and reaching out for what they need to survive. Once again, Nature and human souls are linked. They are also reaching out to happiness, as the poem earlier mentioned flowers enjoying the air they breathe.

The birds, and the twigs on the trees, seem to exist in a world of pleasure — at least, Wordsworth decides he must tell himself that this is so.

I feel that these lines set the tone for what the poem is all about. It may not be specific, but it feels undeniable. Wordsworth ends the poem with the same lament that was mentioned earlier: In it, the unnamed narrator lounges underneath a tree in the wilderness, and contemplates the changes that society has undergone around him.

To her fair works did Nature link The human soul that through me ran; And much it grieved my heart to think What man has made of man.

Lines Written in Early Spring

It was then published again, crediting Wordsworth as the poet, in the second edition of Lyrical Ballads in However, while basking in this setting, he also feels a sadness overcome him.

Lines Written in Early Spring was one such poem. The budding twigs spread out their fan, To catch the breezy air; And I must think, do all I can, That there was pleasure there. We have gone wrong; worse, we have wronged ourselves.

Every movement of the birds, big or small, seems energetic and filled with joy. The reason for the low feelings is revealed as the poem unfolds.

However, for the moral purpose of this poem, it's necessary to set up positive against negative.

Lines Written in Early Spring by William Wordsworth

This is a chilly echo of those words. This applies to Nature herself, mankind, and to the connection forged between them. Analysis I heard a thousand blended notes, While in a grove I sate reclined, The poem begins with a lovely description of something melodious, something the reader can image the speaker henceforth referred to with masculine pronouns enjoys.

He supported the French Revolution, and had concerns about the way that civilization was going, and the things that humans were doing to each other.

Poem of the week: Lines Written in Early Spring by William Wordsworth

Lines Written in Early Spring I heard a thousand blended notes, While in a grove I sate reclined, In that sweet mood when pleasant thoughts Bring sad thoughts to the mind.

At the time of writing, the French Revolution was raging through France, a cultural shock which was to provide the British literary society with enough fodder to last them for years — and Wordsworth was no exception to the rule. These lines serve as a sort of reproach to the Darwinists, racists, exceptionalists, religious bigots etc.

As a result, the rhythm of the poem is generally constant. Perhaps the enjoyed sadness has an erotic quality is there an echo of "parting is such sweet sorrow". He is enjoying the nature surrounding him, noting how it all comes together beautifully. At the onset, he is surrounded by nature but there is something preventing full enjoyment.

It's the mental state provoked by his thoughts that interests him.

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Lines Written in Early Spring William Wordsworth, - I heard a thousand blended notes, While in a grove I sate reclined, In that sweet mood when pleasant thoughts Bring sad thoughts to the mind.

"Lines Written in Early Spring" has a rather simple form: it is composed of only six four-line stanzas, and is written in iambs with an abab rhyme scheme for each stanza. The simplicity of the poem is representative of the bulk of the rest of Wordsworth's works (and of most Romantic poetry).

This week's poem, "Lines Written in Early Spring", has all the simplicity of diction advocated by the two radical young poets, Wordsworth and Coleridge, when they collaborated on Lyrical Ballads.

The famous English poet, William Wordsworth, wrote the poem "Lines Written in Early Spring". This piece was first published in the collection Lyrical Ballads inthough not under his name.

This piece was first published in the collection Lyrical Ballads inthough not under his name. By William Wordsworth. A Complaint. By William Wordsworth. Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, Lines Written in Early Spring By William Wordsworth About this Poet Discussing prose written by poets, Joseph Brodsky has remarked, “the tradition of dividing literature into poetry and prose dates from the.

Poem of the week: Lines Written in Early Spring by William Wordsworth

Jan 29,  · Lines Written in Early Spring is a poem written by William Wordworth, the greatest of the Romantic poet. This is a typical Romantic poem with all the features of Romanticism.

The poem extols Nature, and focuses on the actions of man in contrast to that Nature.

A review of the lines written in the early spring by william wordsworth
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A Short Analysis of William Wordsworth’s ‘Lines Written in Early Spring’ | Interesting Literature